Welcome to PSMS!

We are an organization that encourages the research, education, cultivation, hunting, identification and the cooking of mushrooms. With over 1,200 members, PSMS
is one of the largest mycological societies in the country.

We share our knowledge about mushrooms through meetings, classes, workshops and field trips.

Please join us at a meeting or become a member today!

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Latest PSMS News

Fall "Hildegard Hendrickson ID Clinics" are now done for the season!

Thank you to everyone who participated. See you in the spring!

Check out the PSMS Blog!

Click here to read it.

Upcoming Events

SPECIAL DATE - ONE WEEK EARLY - Tuesday Feb. 7 - 7:30pm

PSMS Monthly Meeting

Exploring Psilocybin as a Tool for Modern Psychology and Medicine

Doors open at 6:30 pm at the Center for Urban Horticulture.

Research on psychedelics as an aid in the treatment of mood and substance use disorders has generated renewed interest over the past decade. Recent pilot studies have shown safety and feasibility of psilocybin, a naturally occurring psychedelic found in some mushrooms of the genus Psilocybe, as a therapeutic tool in the treatment of depression, end-of-life anxiety, alcohol, and tobacco use disorders. Moreover, data suggest a notable effect of psychedelics in occasioning profound and lasting changes in mood, behaviors, and attitudes consistent with enhanced health and well-being. Despite these compelling findings, the mechanisms of action of psychedelic-facilitated treatments remain poorly understood. Preliminary evidence indicates that spiritual and mystical-type drug effects are associated with positive outcomes in psilocybin-facilitated treatments, consistent with early researchers' observations that the subjective effects of psychedelics play a pivotal role in mediating ongoing benefits. This discussion will present an overview of contemporary research with psilocybin, with a focus on the work conducted since 2000 at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Albert Garcia-Romeu, Ph.D. is a member of the Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences faculty at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, where he studies the effects of psychedelic drugs in humans with a focus on psilocybin as an aid in the treatment of addiction. He received his doctorate in psychology from the Institute of Transpersonal Psychology in Palo Alto, CA where he researched self-transcendence, meditation, and altered states of consciousness.